Clarity

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In recent times a number of devices have appeared on the market that promise to deliver a better musical experience than the one you usually receive from your portable digital music player of choice. One such gadget was brought to my attention yesterday – it goes by the name of the Chord Mojo.

“Simply connect Mojo to your iPhone, Android phone, PC, or Mac,” says the site, then “plug in your headphones and you can experience crystal clear audio the way you would hear it in the recording studio.”

So what’s the deal? Can this £300 (US$430) box really deliver on that promise?

Well, maybe. Like so many things in the shadowy world of audio snake oil, the claim comes with some caveats which the manufacturers assiduously avoid bringing to a potential customer’s attention.

The Mojo is what is called in the business a DAC, or Digital to Analog Converter. As you are most likely aware, the music on your portable music device is stored as digital bits. Those bits need to be converted into analog sound waves for them to be heard by your ears. Your musicpod obviously already does this – otherwise you wouldn’t be able to hear anything – but gadgets like the Chord Mojo claim to be able to do it better. To achieve this marvellous feat, the digital-to-analog converter and headphone amplifier circuit on the musicpod is bypassed altogether, and the (bulkier than an iPhone) Mojo plugs into the USB or Lightning socket on your device. You then plug your headphones into the  Mojo, which does the heavy lifting of converting digital bits into analog audio and then amplifying it (in a presumably more-sophisticated way than the DAC in your iPod).

But does it do what is claimed on the box? Probably, in a technical sense, yes. The real deception with products like this is elsewhere, so we have do a little sifting to find where the truth actually lies. Take that sentence from the website: “…crystal clear audio the way you would hear it in the recording studio.” That’s an amazing pledge – is that really what you could expect if you just plugged it into your iDevice straight off the shelf?

I doubt it. The truth is that this promise is based on something that the makers of the Mojo neglect to mention: it all depends on how your music files are made. If, like the great majority of people, your files are compressed into mp3 or AAC file formats, it’s simply a lie. No DAC, no matter how good, is going to make your mp3s sound like ‘audio the way you would hear it in a recording studio’. It’s even a highly contentious claim, in fact, to say that it would necessarily make your compressed music sound any better than the DAC already present in your music player does.

Now, if you happen to carry all your music around uncompressed (and I know absolutely no-one who does that – not me, nor any of my very experienced audio professional friends), you might benefit from a better DAC than the one in your iPod. Might. Because this would also depend on other factors, one of those being that a pair of Sony ear buds (like the ones in the promotional photo on the Chord Mojo site) would not aid you in this pursuit. In other words, a great deal depends on the quality of the headphones you’re using; tiny ear buds, no matter how good, will not deliver you ‘audio the way you would hear it in a recording studio’.

What the Chord Mojo site – and indeed, most other sites selling these portable DACs – leads an unknowledgeable reader to assume is that buying this expensive gadget and simply inserting it in their normal setup will give them better sound.

It won’t.

Hummadruz advice: If you really care about your music sounding better, just listen to it off CDs, or make uncompressed digital versions. And, if you do happen to have a cool $400+ burning a hole in your pocket, invest in a decent set of headphones.

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